Wednesday, 20 November 2013 00:00

Eastern Market

Eastern Market, Washington DC's original and premier food & arts market. Located in the heart of the historic Capitol Hill neighborhood, Eastern Market is DC's destination for fresh food, community events, and on weekends, local farm-fresh produce and handmade arts and crafts. Click through our website to find out everything that the market has to offer. Email us if you have any questions and most importantly, come visit us! For over 136 years, Eastern Market has served as a community hub, connecting neighbors, families and visitors.

Published in Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Emancipation Memorial

The Emancipation Memorial, also known as the Freedman’s Memorial or the Emancipation Group, and sometimes referred to as the "Lincoln Memorial" before the more prominent so-named memorial was built, is a monument in Lincoln Park in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C. See attached Google map for directions and closest Metro stop.

Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt memorial is a presidential memorial dedicated to the memory of U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and to the era he represents. For the memorial's designer, landscape architect Lawrence Halprin, the memorial site represents the capstone of a distinguished career, partly because the landscape architect had fond memories of Roosevelt, and partly because of the sheer difficulty of the task.

Dedicated on May 2, 1997 by President Bill Clinton, the monument, spread over 7.5 acres (3.0 ha), traces 12 years of the history of the United States through a sequence of four outdoor rooms, one for each of FDR's terms of office. Sculptures inspired by photographs depict the 32nd president alongside his dog Fala. Other sculptures depict scenes from the Great Depression, such as listening to a fireside chat on the radio and waiting in a bread line, a bronze sculpture by George Segal. A bronze statue of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt standing before the United Nations emblem honors her dedication to the UN. It is the only presidential memorial to depict a First Lady.

Considering Roosevelt's disability, the memorial's designers intended to create a memorial that would be accessible to those with various physical impairments. Among other features, the memorial includes an area with tactile reliefs with braille writing for people who are blind. However, the memorial faced serious criticism from disabled activists. Vision-impaired visitors complained that the braille dots were improperly spaced and that some of the braille and reliefs were mounted eight feet off of the ground, placing it above the reach of most people

Published in Historical Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

George Washington Masonic Memorial

The George Washington Masonic National Memorial was built in the 1920s by the more than two million American Freemasons who wished to: “express in durability and beauty the undying esteem of the Freemasons of the United States for him in whose memory it shall stand throughout the coming years.”

This magnificent structure is privately funded through the grateful contributions of Freemasons and others, and remains open to the public, seven days a week.

The George Washington Masonic National Memorial is more than a colossal memorial and museum. It is a tourist attraction and destination;   research center and library; community center; performing arts center and concert hall; banquet and celebration site; and meeting site for local and countless visiting Masonic lodges and organizations. However, first and foremost, it is a memorial to honor and perpetuate the memory, character and virtues of the man who best exemplifies what Freemasons are and ought to be, Brother George Washington.

Our Vision: “To inspire humanity through education to emulate and promote the virtues, character and vision of George Washington, the Man, the Mason and Father of our Country.”

Published in Historical Attractions
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 00:00

Gettysburg Battlefield Museum

Your visit to Gettysburg National Military Park should be time well spent! The mission of the National Park Service and its partner, the Gettysburg Foundation, is to provide each and every visitor with a quality experience while visiting the Museum and Visitor Center, walking in the Soldiers' National Cemetery where President Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous Gettysburg Address,and while touring the battlefield park. There are a number of suggestions we can offer to help you map out the time you will spend at the park and the basic information on this page will guide you in planning your visit. We encourage you to explore our other web pages, especially Things to Do and Things to Know Before You Comeas these provide up to date information on park events and programs that will be of interest.

Where should we begin our visit to the park? Begin your visit at the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center, 1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg, where the park offers free information, an extensive museum about Gettysburg and the Civil War, the fully restored Gettysburg Cyclorama that dramatically depicts "Pickett's Charge", and the film "A New Birth of Freedom", narrated by award-winning actor Morgan Freeman, which focuses on the significance of Gettysburg. There is an entry fee for admission to the museum, film and Gettysburg Cyclorama. The center also provides information on the numerous ways to tour the battlefield park including the Licensed Battlefield Guide service, an expansive bookstore managed by Event Network, Inc., and a refreshment saloon that offers snacks, sandwiches and drinks in a Civil War period atmosphere. Shuttle buses to Eisenhower National Historic Site are available from the Visitor Center.

How long should I plan for my visit? Plan to spend a minimum of four hours at the park, though an entire day is more desirable if you wish to take advantage of the museum, film and cyclorama program, have a leisurely tour of the park and visit nearby attractions. Recently, visitors have spent an average of three and one half hours in the museum alone!

What kind of park tours are best for me? The park offers a number of battlefield tours that can be arranged at the Museum and Visitor Center. Tour the park with a Licensed Battlefield Guide in the convenience of your own vehicle or ride along with others on a tour bus accompanied by a guide (offered seasonally). There is a fee for a guided tour. We also offer self-guiding auto tours and tours on compact disk, which can be purchased at the museum book store. Commercial bus tours of the park are available through companies in Gettysburg.

Thursday, 21 November 2013 00:00

Great Falls Park

Great Falls Park is a small National Park Service (NPS) site in Virginia, United States. Situated on 800 acres along the banks of the Potomac River in northern Fairfax County, the park is a disconnected but integral part of the George Washington Memorial Parkway. The Great Falls of the Potomac River are near the northern boundary of the park, as are the remains of the Patowmack Canal, the first canal in the United States that used locks to raise and lower boats.

At Great Falls, the Potomac River builds up speed and force as it falls over a series of steep, jagged rocks and flows through the narrow Mather Gorge. The Patowmack Canal offers a glimpse into the early history of this country. Great Falls Park has many opportunities to explore history and nature, all in a beautiful 800-acre park only 15 miles from the Nation's Capital.

Wednesday, 20 November 2013 00:00

Harpers Ferry National Historic Park

A visit to this quaint, historic community, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers, is like stepping into the past.  Stroll the picturesque streets, visit exhibits and museums, or hike our trails and battlefields. Spend a day or a weekend.  We have something for everyone, so come and discover Harpers Ferry!

Harpers Ferry is a historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, United States. It was formerly Harper's Ferry with an apostrophe and that form continues to appear in some references. It is situated at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers where the U.S. states of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia meet. It is the easternmost town in West Virginia. The town is located on a low-lying flood plain created by the two rivers and surrounded by higher ground. Historically, Harpers Ferry is best known for John Brown's raid on the Armory in 1859 and its role in the American Civil War. The population was 286 at the 2010 census.

The lower part of Harpers Ferry is located within Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Most of the remainder, which includes the more highly populated area, is included in the separate Harpers Ferry Historic District. Two other National Register of Historic Places properties adjoin the town: the B & O Railroad Potomac River Crossing and St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church.

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) headquarters is located in Harpers Ferry and the town is one of only a few through which the Appalachian Trail passes directly. Harpers Ferry is also an outdoor recreation destination. Popular activities include white water rafting, fishing, mountain biking, tubing, canoeing, hiking, zip lining, and rock climbing.

Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Jefferson Memorial

Beneath the marble rotunda, the 19-foot statue of the third U.S. president is surrounded by passages from the Declaration of Independence and other famous Jefferson writings. Open daily except Dec. 25. Free. Park ranger in attendance 8 am - midnight.

Published in Historical Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Korean War Veterans Memorial

The Korean War Veterans Memorial is located in Washington, D.C.'s West Potomac Park, southeast of the Lincoln Memorial and just south of the Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. It commemorates those who served in the Korean War.

The main memorial is in the form of a triangle intersecting a circle. Walls: 164 feet (50 m) long, 8 inches (200 mm) thick; more than 100 tons of highly polished "Academy Black" granite from California: more than 2,500 photographic, archival images representing the land, sea and air troops who supported those who fought in the war are sandblasted onto the wall.

Within the walled triangle are 19 stainless steel statues designed by Frank Gaylord, each larger than life-size, between 7 feet 3 inches (2.21 m) and 7 feet 6 inches (2.29 m) tall; each weighs nearly 1,000 pounds (500 kg). The figures represent a squad on patrol, drawn from each branch of the armed forces; fourteen of the figures are from the U.S. Army, three are from the Marine Corps, one is a Navy Corpsman, and one is an Air Force Forward Air Observer. They are dressed in full combat gear, dispersed among strips of granite and juniper bushes which represent the rugged terrain of Korea.

When reflected on the wall, there appear to be 38 soldiers, representing the 38th parallel. To the north of the statues is a path, forming one side of the triangle. Behind, to the south, is a 164-foot-long black granite wall, created by Louis Nelson, with photographic images sandblasted into it depicting soldiers, equipment and people involved in the war. This forms the second side of the triangle. The third side of the triangle, facing towards the Lincoln Memorial, is open.

Published in Historical Attractions
Friday, 22 November 2013 00:00

Lady Bird Johnson Park

Lady Bird Johnson earned many awards, including a Presidential Medal of Freedom for her work to transform the American landscape and preserve its natural beauty as a national treasure. In 1968 Columbia Island was renamed in her honor. Graceful plantings and picturesque views recall her conviction that beauty can make the world less grim and tense
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