Tuesday, 19 November 2013 00:00

International Spy Museum

The International Spy Museum is a privately owned museum dedicated to the tradecraft, history and contemporary role of espionage, featuring the largest collection of international espionage artifacts currently on public display. The museum is located within the 1875 Le Droit Building in the Penn Quarter neighborhood of Washington, D.C., and is across the street from the Old Patent Office Building (which houses the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery). The museum is located and one block south of the Gallery Place Metro station via Red, Green and Yellow lines.

On September 23, 2013 it was announced by the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. that the International Spy Museum will be relocating to the society's Carnegie Library building at Mt. Vernon Square under a proposal that envisions a 40,000-square-foot underground addition for use by the museum, with a new glass structure on the north side of the building housing a visitor's center and other dining and entertainment venues

Published in Attractions
Monday, 03 November 2014 00:00

International Spy Museum

$5 off general admission tickets
Published in Attractions
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 00:00

Manassas National Battlefield

Manassas National Battlefield Park, located north of Manassas, in Prince William County, Virginia, preserves the site of two major American Civil War battles: the First Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861, and the Second Battle of Bull Run which was fought between August 28 and August 30, 1862 (also known as the First Battle of Manassas and the Second Battle of Manassas, respectively). The peaceful Virginia countryside bore witness to clashes between the armies of the North (Union) and the South (Confederacy), and it was there that Confederate General Thomas J. Jackson acquired his nickname "Stonewall."

Today the National Battlefield Park provides the opportunity for visitors to explore the historic terrain where men fought and died more than a century ago. More than 900,000 people visit the battlefield each year. (In comparison, roughly 15 million people annually visit nearby Washington, DC.) As a historic area under the National Park Service, the park was administratively listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966.

The Henry Hill Visitor Center, on Sudley Road by the south entrance to the park, offers exhibits and interpretation regarding the First Battle of Bull Run, including civil war era uniforms, weapons, field gear and an electronic battle map. The center offers the orientation film "Manassas: End of Innocence", as well as a bookstore

Published in Historical Attractions
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 00:00

Marine Corps Museum

The National Museum of the Marine Corps is the historical museum of the United States Marine Corps. Located in Triangle, Virginia near MCB Quantico, the museum opened on November 10, 2006, and is now the top tourist attraction in the state, drawing over 500,000 people annually.

The museum replaces both the Marine Corps Historical Center in the Washington Navy Yard, which closed on July 1, 2005, and the Marine Corps Air-Ground Museum in Quantico, Virginia, which closed on November 15, 2002.

A public-private venture, the museum is a cooperative effort between the United States Marine Corps and the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation. The Foundation manages the museum operation, while the museum building will be donated to the Marine Corps.

Designed by Curtis W. Fentress of Fentress Architects, the museum's exterior is meant to "evoke the image of the flag raisers of Iwo Jima," an image that is also preserved by the Marine Corps War Memorial.

The museum is 100,000-square-foot, and is open to the public with free admission.

Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Mount Vernon Estate

George Washington, commander in chief of American forces in the Revolutionary War and the first president of the United States, called Mount Vernon home for more than 40 years. George Washington and his wife Martha Washington lived at Mount Vernon, which is now the most popular historic estate in America. Situated along the Potomac River in Northern Virginia, Mount Vernon is just 16 miles south of Washington, D.C.

Today, guests to Mount Vernon can visit the Mansion, more than a dozen original structures, Washington’s Tomb, and nearly 50 acres of his extensive plantation. The estate also includes a working blacksmith shop and the Pioneer Farm, a 4-acre demonstration farm with a reconstructed slave cabin and 16-sided treading barn.

The Ford Orientation Center features an inspiring film, We Fight To Be Free. The Donald W. Reynolds Museum and Education Center is home to 25 theaters and galleries, which tell the detailed story of George Washington's life with more than 500 original artifacts, 11 video presentations, and even an immersion theater experience.

Just 3 miles down the road from the Mansion, George Washington’s Distillery & Gristmill have been reconstructed and are open seasonally. Both fully functioning, Washington's fascinating mill and distillery tell their story of Washington as a master entrepreneur.

Mount Vernon is an American landmark and a lasting reminder of the life and legacy of the Father of Our Country. Visit Mount Vernon, and discover the real George Washington.

Published in Historical Attractions
Thursday, 21 November 2013 00:00

NASA Goddard Visitor Center

NASA captures your attention like no other organization. It offers unparalleled experiences, a key to knowledge, and a window to the future. Activities, exhibits and events at NASA Goddard's Visitor Center in Greenbelt, Md., provide inspiring and captivating educational experiences for all ages.

The visitor center demonstrates Goddard's innovative and exciting work in Earth science, astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary science, engineering, communication and technology development. Browse the unique, informative exhibits and learn about climate change, climb inside a Gemini capsule model, encourage a child to dream as he or she pulls on our kid-sized space suit, or participate in one of the monthly model rocket launches.

Only 30 minutes from Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Annapolis, don’t miss this opportunity to explore the universe in your own backyard.

Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

National Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum maintains the world's largest and  most significant collection of aviation and space artifacts, encompassing all aspects of human flight, as  well as related works of art and archival materials. It operates two landmark  facilities that, together, welcome more than eight million visitors a year, making it the most visited museum in the country. It also is home to the Center for Earth and  Planetary Studies.

The Museum houses thousands of artifacts showcased in exhibitions on  aviation, space exploration, and planetary science. At both of its locations, the Museum presents programs, educational activities, lectures, and performances that reflect the American  spirit, and the innovation, courage, and optimism that have led to triumphs in  the history, science and technology of flight. At the Museum in Washington, DC, which  opened in 1976 and is located in the heart of the Smithsonian complex in Washington, DC, some of the most awe-inspiring icons of flight are on display. 

The National Air and Space Museum is the largest of 19 museums included in the Smithsonian Institution. The Museum's Director is assisted by three Associate Directors, who oversee Research and Curatorial Affairs; Management and Public Programs; and External Affairs. The Smithsonian's aeronautical collection began in 1876 when a group of kites was  acquired from the Chinese Imperial Commission.

Published in Historical Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

National Arboretum

The National Arboretum in Washington, DC displays 446 acres of trees, shrubs and plants and is one of the largest arboretums in the country. Visitors enjoy a variety of exhibits from formal landscaped gardens to the Gotelli Dwarf and slow growing Conifer Collection. The National Arboretum is most known for its bonsai collection. Other special displays include seasonal exhibits, aquatic plants, and a National Herb garden. During the early spring, the site is popular spot to see more than 70 varieties of Cherry Trees.

Friday, 07 November 2014 00:00

National Fire Academy

The National Fire Academy (NFA) is one of two schools in the United States operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) at the National Emergency Training Center (NETC) in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Operated and governed by the United States Fire Administration (USFA) as part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the NFA is the country’s pre-eminent federal fire training and education institution. The original purpose of the NFA as detailed in a 1973 report to Congress was to “function as the core of the Nation’s efforts in fire service education—feeding out model programs, curricula, and information…”

The NFA shares its 107-acre Emmitsburg campus with the Emergency Management Institute (EMI) operated by the Directorate of Preparedness branch of FEMA. The campus also includes the Learning Resource Center (LRC) library, the National Fire Data Center, and the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial.

The campus was the original site of Saint Joseph’s Academy, a Catholic school for girls from 1809 until 1973. It was purchased by the U.S. Government in 1979 for use as the NETC.

In 2008, the National Fire Academy trained over 122,000 first responders from all 50 States.

Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

National Gallery of Art

The National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are a national art museum in Washington, D.C. Andrew W. Mellon donated a substantial art collection and funds for construction of the museum. The core collection also includes major works of art donated by Paul Mellon, Ailsa Mellon Bruce, Lessing J. Rosenwald, Samuel Henry Kress, Rush Harrison Kress, Peter Arrell Brown Widener, Joseph E. Widener, and Chester Dale. The Gallery's collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals, and decorative arts traces the development of Western Art from the Middle Ages to the present, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile ever created by Alexander Calder.

The Gallery's campus includes the original neoclassical West Building designed by John Russell Pope, which is linked underground to the modern East Building, designed by I. M. Pei, and the 6.1-acre Sculpture Garden. The Gallery often presents temporary special exhibitions spanning the world and the history of art.

 
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