Wednesday, 20 November 2013 00:00

Corcoran Museum of Art

The Corcoran Gallery of Art is one of the oldest privately supported cultural institutions in Washington, DC. The museum's main focus is American art. The permanent collection includes works by Rembrandt Peale, Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas, Thomas Gainsborough, John Singer Sargent, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Edward Hopper, Willem de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, Gene Davis, and many others. Founded in 1869 by William Wilson Corcoran, the Corcoran was the oldest and largest non-federal art museum in the District of Columbia. Its mission is "dedicated to art and used solely for the purpose of encouraging the American genius."

Published in Attractions
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 00:00

Eastern Market

Eastern Market, Washington DC's original and premier food & arts market. Located in the heart of the historic Capitol Hill neighborhood, Eastern Market is DC's destination for fresh food, community events, and on weekends, local farm-fresh produce and handmade arts and crafts. Click through our website to find out everything that the market has to offer. Email us if you have any questions and most importantly, come visit us! For over 136 years, Eastern Market has served as a community hub, connecting neighbors, families and visitors.

Published in Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Emancipation Memorial

The Emancipation Memorial, also known as the Freedman’s Memorial or the Emancipation Group, and sometimes referred to as the "Lincoln Memorial" before the more prominent so-named memorial was built, is a monument in Lincoln Park in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C. See attached Google map for directions and closest Metro stop.

Monday, 03 November 2014 00:00

International Spy Museum

$5 off general admission tickets
Published in Attractions
Tuesday, 19 November 2013 00:00

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections.

The Library's mission is to support the Congress in fulfilling its constitutional duties and to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people.

As Librarian of Congress, I oversee the many thousands of dedicated staff who acquire, catalog, preserve, and make available library collections within our three buildings on Capitol Hill and over the Internet. I am pleased that you are visiting our Web site today, and I invite you return to it often.

Published in Historical Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

National Shrine

The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is a prominent Latin Rite Roman Catholic basilica located in Washington, D.C., USA, honoring the Blessed Virgin Mary as Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, the principal Patroness of the USA.

The shrine is the largest Catholic church in the USA, the largest church of any kind in the western hemisphere, the eighth largest church building in the world, and the tallest building in Washington, D.C[2][3] (the Washington Monument is taller, but is not a habitable building). An estimated one million pilgrims from around the country and the world visit the basilica each year. The basilica is on Michigan Avenue in the northeast quadrant of Washington, on land donated by The Catholic University of America. As of 2013 the rector of the shrine was Monsignor Walter R. Rossi, who possesses a Licentiate of Canon Law.

Construction of this church, notable for its Neo-Byzantine architecture, began in 1920 under Philadelphian contractor John McShain. It opened unfinished in 1959. The Basilica is the Patronal Catholic Church of the United States,[4] honoring the Virgin Mary, under the title Immaculate Conception. The cathedral church of the Archdiocese of Washington is the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle, not the Basilica.

The shrine has merited several papal visits, by Pope John Paul II who designated the National Shrine as a Minor Basilica in October 12, 1990 and Pope Benedict XVI, who bestowed the honor of a Golden Rose to the basilica. The Basilica does not have its own parish community, but it serves the adjacent University, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (located down the street), and hosts numerous Holy Masses for various organizations of the Church from across the States.

Published in Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Old Stone House

The Old Stone House is the oldest unchanged building in Washington, D.C. The house is also Washington's last Pre-Revolutionary Colonial building on its original foundation.

The Old Stone House, built in 1765, was constructed in three phases during the 18th century and is an example of vernacular architecture. During its history, the house was started as a one-story building and gradually became a used car dealership later. After a renovation by the National Park Service in the 1950s, the Old Stone House was turned into a house museum. The Old Stone House stands among the neighborhood's stores and restaurants as an example of local history for tourists, shoppers, and students.

Published in Historical Attractions
Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

President Lincoln's Cottage

Developed the Emancipation Proclamation while living in a Gothic Revival Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home in Washington, DC., President Lincoln's Cottage served as bookends for Civil War — he first visited the grounds three days after his inauguration and last rode out to the site the day before his assassination. While living at the Cottage for 13 months from June-November of 1862-1864, Lincoln regularly commuted to the White House. The Cottage opened to the public in 2008, and is run by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, a private, non-profit organization, through an agreement with the Armed Forces Retirement Home.

 
Published in Historical Attractions
Tuesday, 19 November 2013 00:00

President Lincoln's Cottage

President Lincoln's Cottage is a national monument on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home, known today as the Armed Forces Retirement Home. It is located near the Petworth and Park View neighborhoods of Washington, D.C.. President Lincoln's Cottage was formerly known as Anderson Cottage.

President Abraham Lincoln and family resided seasonally on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home to escape the heat and political pressure of downtown Washington, as did President James Buchanan (1857–1861) before him. President Lincoln's Cottage also served as the Summer White House for Presidents Rutherford B. Hayes (1877–1881) and Chester A. Arthur (1881–1885)

The historic Cottage, built in the Gothic revival style, was constructed from 1842 to 1843 as the home of George Washington Riggs, who went on to establish the Riggs National Bank in Washington, D.C. Lincoln lived in the cottage June to November 1862 through 1864 and during the first summer living there, Lincoln drafted the preliminary draft of the Emancipation Proclamation. Mary Todd Lincoln fondly recalled the campus; in 1865, she wrote, "How dearly I loved the Soldiers' Home."

The Soldiers' Home stands on 251 acres (1.02 km2) atop the third highest point in Washington. The Home was designated a National Historic Landmark on November 7, 1973, and listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 11, 1974. In 2000, the cottage was placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation's 11 Most Endangered list. Then about 2.3 acres (9,300 m2) of the Home was proclaimed a National Monument by President Bill Clinton on July 7, 2000. The National Trust took on the restoration which was completed in 2007. The Cottage exterior was restored to the period of Lincoln’s occupancy in the 1860s by the Philadelphia firm J. S. Cornell & Son, according to the standards of the National Park Service. Today it is managed through a cooperative agreement between the Armed Forces Retirement Home and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

President Lincoln's Cottage opened to the public on February 18, 2008, as a National Trust historic site. A reproduction of the Lincoln desk on which he wrote the Emancipation Proclamation was commissioned by the Trust for use in the Cottage. The original drop-lid walnut paneled desk is in the Lincoln Bedroom of the White House. The desk is the only surviving piece of furniture that is known to have been placed in the White House and the Cottage during the Lincoln era.

The adjacent Robert H. Smith Visitor Education Center features exhibits about the Soldiers' Home, wartime Washington, D.C., Lincoln as Commander-in-Chief during the Civil War, and a special exhibit gallery. President Lincoln's Cottage and Visitor Education Center is open to the public for tours seven days a week.

Thursday, 31 October 2013 00:00

Renwick Gallery American Art Museum

The Renwick Gallery is a branch of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, located in Washington, D.C., and focuses on American craft and decorative arts from the 19th century to the 21st century. It is housed in a National Historic Landmark building that was begun in 1859 on Pennsylvania Avenue and originally housed the Corcoran Gallery of Art (now one block from the White House and across the street from the Old Executive Office Building). When it was build in 1859, it was known, at the time, as the American Louvre.

The first-floor gallery features temporary exhibits that usually rotate about twice a year. On the second floor, in the Grand Salon, is one of the most famous art-filled rooms in Washington, it is hung with 70 paintings, by 51 American artists, painted between 1840 and 1930.

The Renwick Gallery, the Museum's branch location for contemporary American craft and decorative arts, is located steps from the White House in the heart of historic federal Washington.

 
Page 1 of 2